The People of the Sign by Wade Fransson

(13 customer reviews)

$14.95

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Description

What do divorce, kidnapping, the Stockholm Syndrome, ancient prophecies, and the collapse of the Soviet Union have in common with the music of the Beatles? The People of the Sign effortlessly weaves these together, proving once and for all, that truth really is far, far stranger than fiction.

KINDLE EDITION

About the Author

Wade Fransson manages technology vendor negotiations and contracts for Kohl’s Department stores. He has a background in business and technology for major corporations and was the CEO of GoHuman, Inc. online marketplace. In “The People of the Sign,” he shares his story to show both the positives and negatives of one of the most fascinating churches born in the 20th century.

 

Additional information

Dimensions 6 × 1 × 9 in

13 reviews for The People of the Sign by Wade Fransson

  1. Eric Mondschein

    Wade Fransson’s “People of the Sign” is an engaging, no holds barred, look into the life of young boy who becomes a man in search of the real meaning of life and his very existence. It is a well-written story of personal triumph with universal appeal – one that will both be of interest to, and motivate, seekers of all faiths, in their noble quest, to understand the Mystery of God. Wade uses his life, with its many ups and downs, its failures and accomplishments to explore the meaning of reconciliation, of growth, forgiveness, strength and courage as we all go though life trying not just to survive, but to find meaning, contribute to, and advance ourselves, our family and society. His exploration of religious identity and faith, his quest for “Pure and undefiled religion” (from James 1:27), will be of interest to all, no matter one’s religious identity. Fransson provides the reader an opportunity to explore what is truly important in our own lives and he does it without preaching, but by allowing us to participate in his own unique and captivating journey, a journey we are all on. The “People of the Sign” is, but the beginning of a fascinating voyage that Wade has undertaken, and thankfully has been willing to share with anyone who is as curious and in awe of life as he is. I highly recommend this book to you, and I can’t wait for the next volume to be released.

  2. Valerie Simons

    Although skeptical before reading it, I soon appreciated Wade’s perspective and description of his Worldwide Church of God (WCG) experience. As one who also knows WCG from the inside since childhood, I found that his descriptions of the doctrinal beliefs and teachings of WCG were “spot on”, as were the depictions of the relationships between members and church leadership and the dynamics between headquarters and field offices. Despite not knowing Wade personally during his WCG years, I also witnessed many similar types of incidents and interactions within the church. Probably more than anything else, I appreciated his courage in sharing his story — despite both painful and positive. (Too often, only the bitter and resentful have spewed their myopic view without the grace that Wade shows in granting the benefit of the doubt.) His use of musical references is a brilliant link to sheets’ worth of additional narrative. Those more attuned to the references will appreciate the depth it adds to their understanding of his reality. Those without prior WCG exposure will get an insider’s account of a journey into and through the bowels of an organization that has been viewed both as “cult-ish” by its own former members and an outright cult by those less familiar with its founder’s objectives and more of an axe to grind. This account will make you think about your own perceptions and journey in a new way. I hope that Wade’s future works will be equally gracious to its participants and offer hope that we can all reach for a condition of awareness without judgment.

  3. Jeanne Dorothy

    Wade’s story is beautifully written and is easily interpreted as one of courage, success and triumph As someone who was born into the WCG, I truly appreciated his factual, non-critical approach to deciphering the life he was born into. I have no doubt, his “story” then, now and future will continue to inspire and connect with all of humanity. Looking forward to reading the next chapter.

  4. D Clark

    The initial reviews caught my attention yet the book delivered even more. Wade has written a very moving story that it is well worth reading whether you had ever heard of the Worldwide Church of God or not. I shared my book with other family members and they found it as interesting and gripping as I did. Once you start, it is difficult to set it down.

  5. Laura H.

    Fransson’s ability to honestly and articulately self-analyze underpins the first installment of a story that will resonate with any disillusioned seekers, but offers an additional layer of interest to those familiar with the Worldwide Church of God. His narrative is captivating, filled with anecdotes of extreme familial dysfunction, spiritual angst, and the combination of good intentions and organizational politics that buffeted him back and forth across the Atlantic. At the risk of trivializing what must have been an intensely unpleasant exercise in personal recall and introspection, I confess I can’t wait to see where the next volume takes our flawed but likable protagonist.

  6. R. A. Jamerson

    Although, we did not spend time together, I attended Ambassador College at the same time as Wade did and I was a member of the WCG (WW Church of God) for about 22 years. I can relate to many of Wade’s experiences on several levels. I myself had, at times, a difficult childhood with an absentee father and living in some less than desirable areas of my hometown. I myself eventually became a juvenile delinquent.

    Some might accuse Wade of “whitewashing” stories of life in the WCG, but not everyone is one of the walking wounded. It is a fact that some were sorely mistreated by either College professors or their local minister. It really depended on where you lived and who your Pastor was.

    Wade took a calculated risk in revealing some his personal struggles and hang ups. I am saddened that some have criticized him from that perspective. All I can say is: “Walk a mile in his shoes………don’t criticize or accuse……vilify or abuse….. till you walked a mile in his shoes…..”

    Wade does an excellent job of summarizing the beliefs and practices of the WCG. He also relates some of his negative experiences without bitterness or rancor. If you want an inside and balanced view of the WCG from that era, this book is for you.

  7. Margaret Van Deurzen

    I found Wade Fransson’s life journey in “The People of the Sign” to be heartfelt & incredibly inspiring; it’s a journey of great pain, soul searching, & optimism. Throughout the entire book Wade’s heart shone through-his need to forgive, his decision to take the better road instead of the bitter road, & his belief in the human spirit & the God Spirit (that goes beyond any church hierarchy).

    After an abusive childhood, he walks into adulthood carrying the baggage of that awful childhood. However he honestly faces his past, himself, his actions, & motivations with a raw honesty that is both courageous & at times frightening. For anyone facing similar challenges from their past, or facing any kind of spiritual crisis or questions, you may well find Wade’s journey to be inspiring. It may touch a place in your soul, as it did for me.

  8. Verona Lucas – V.E.Lucas

    This is a fascinating stories and the writer has not held back on how the events in his life affected him. It is a good read and I would like to read the the other two books

  9. S.VANISHREE

    A great book and a truly inspiring story

  10. Joseph D. Vitulli

    Great awesome book….the guy knows how to write, carving his words from stone.
    Get this book….

  11. donsabai

    This book intrigued me and I enjoyed it very much. For me, I especially appreciated the spiritual aspect of this book and the struggle to improve and grow and overcome. Well written and encouraging.

  12. Bill Fairchild

    We all have the same goal in life, whether we know it yet or not, which is to grow up, mature, and learn lessons in how to get along with, care about, and love all other people. But we don’t all learn the same lessons in the same sequence. This book is all about one man’s learning his lessons of life, and he has much to teach all the rest of us.

    I met the author, Wade Fransson, in 1994 when he was a minister in Germany and I was there on business. We lost contact with each other for 25 years, and now have reconnected through his writing and my reading of this book. Wade and I were in the same fundamentalist church, I went through many of the same experiences he did, but our lives were certainly far from identical. When we learn a lesson there is often pain involved, since lessons usually require learning from our mistakes what not to do or how to do things better. Reading this book was cathartic for me in many deep, personal ways. Wade has given us all a great example in this travelogue of his life in how to recognize the subtle hints that may show us whether we are doing the next right thing, sometimes small things and sometimes making major changes in our lives.
    His writing style is very good, keeping my interest, giving hints of future events, and looking back on all he has done and profiting by the introspection. Fluent in Swedish, English, and German, and very knowledgeable in French and Russian, he has traveled much in Europe and the USA and has wisdom for us all if we are willing to learn.
    I am looking forward greatly to reading his two other books.

  13. P. Leeb

    I stumbled across this book by pure serendipity the day after I attended an online presentation by the author titled “How the Gospel of Matthew speaks to Jesus’ Birth and His Return” (super interesting whether you’re religious or not, BTW — it’s on YouTube). The presentation displayed a depth of knowedge about the Bible that was incredibly deep and detailed and laid out clearly and interestingly. I thought, that’s an interesting coincidence, and bought the Kindle version. Well, it’s a page turner, going into detail about a tumultuous, to say the least, childhood; reckless and difficult teen years, and his transformation into a scholar and rising minister of the Worldwide Church of God. The ending is a cliffhanger, no spoilers here, have just bought the second book and urge you to start this trilogy.

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